Norway

Norway is undoubtedly one of the world’s most beautiful countries, known for its stunning fjords, the spectacular Northern Lights, an endless array of ski resorts and several fantastically modern, and some charming cities. Norway is statistically one of the happiest countries in the world. Norway was officially named as the world’s most prosperous country, which takes into account factors such as the economy, personal freedom and education. The cost of living in Norway is high. Food and transport is generally more expensive than in most other European countries. Accommodation can be pricey in the cities, especially Oslo, Stavanger and Bergen, whereas in the smaller cities and in the countryside accommodation can be surprisingly affordable.

Fjord

Norway has a multitude of fjords, all of which have their own unique characteristics. By taking one of our tours you can get an unforgettable experience of our beautiful Norwegian fjords. Along the sides and at the inner and outer ends of each fjord you’ll find small communities and villages, each with its own speciality that reflects its local traditions and what was possible to grow in each place.

Fjord

The fjords are by far the biggest attraction in Scandinavia, and Bergen is by far the best starting point for exploring the nature visitors come from all over the world to see. Bergen is situated halfway between the two biggest fjords in Western Norway the Sognefjord and the Hardangerfjord and it also has a fantastic coastline with thousands of large and small islands.

Fjord

Oslo Karl Johans gate

Karl Johans gate (Karl Johan Street) was named after King Karl Johan and it is Oslo's main pedestrain street. It is about 1 mile long and it connects the central railway station to the Royal palace, passing by many other attractions and monuments (like the Parliament building and the National Theatre)

Karl Johans Gate

This is one street you must walk down. There is plenty to see along here. I started with a view of it from the Royal Palace, then walked down the hill to actually walk along the street. There were lots of people along here, and no wonder, as there are heaps of shops, restaurants, gorgeous parks for the city workers to sit and enjoy lunch or for people to meet each other. Lots of important buildings are on this street.

Karl Johans Gate

Karl Johans Gate

Karl Johans Gate

Vigeland Park

Oslo’s most visited tourist destination, the Vigeland Park, is the largest sculpture park in the world by a single artist, and boasts over 200 pieces by Norwegian sculptor Gustav Vigeland.

Vigeland Park

The collection, dubbed ‘The Weirdest Statues in the World’ by The Daily Mail, includes everything from a woman embracing a giant lizard to a naked man fighting flying babies, and everything in between. Set along a boulevard in Oslo’s Frogner Park, the Vigeland installation consists of 212 sculptures made from bronze and granite, spread over an 850-meter axis from the entrance to the park’s centrepiece, ‘the Monolith’. 

Vigeland Park

The sculptures consist of naked human figures, in all variety of poses and situations from the pastoral to the downright surreal – exploring the human form and human life, at its purest.

Vigeland Park

Stave church at the Norsk Folkemuseum

Stave churches are considered to be among the most important examples of wooden Medieval architecture in Europe. In the Middle Ages, there were probably more than 1,000 stave churches in Norway, today only 28 remain.

Stave church

A stave church is made of wood, and the construction is made out of poles ("staver" in Norwegian), hence the name. In the middle ages there were similar types of churches all over North-Western Europe. 

In Norway there was a tradition for using wood in artwork as well as in constructions, and this lead to the development of a unique technique that the stave churches are a perfect example of. The decoration is a fascinating mix of both Christian and viking symbolism.

Borgund stave church in Lærdal is the most visited and most photographed church. 

Stave church

Trondheim Nidaros Cathedral

Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim is the largest medieval building in Scandinavia and the most important church in Norway. Since its foundation in 1066 it has been an important pilgrimage destination, thanks to its relics of St. Olav, a Norwegian king and national hero.

Nidaros Cathedral

Nidaros cathedral is a fascinating combination of medieval architectural styles. Its foundations are those of a simple 11th-century basilica, but it was significantly enlarged to a grand pilgrimage church in the early 12th century. The Romanesque transept, probably built by stonemasons from Lincoln, survives from this period. 

Nidaros Cathedral inside

Since restoration work began in the mid-19th-century, many new artworks have been donated to the cathedral. American visitors might wish to stop by the Altar of the Holy Cross at the east end of the nave - it supports a 2.6m-high silver crucifix presented by Norwegian emigrants to the USA on the anniversary of Olav's death in 1930.

Nidaros Cathedral inside

Grip Island

The first indications of settlement at Grip is from the ninth century, where fishermen settled close to the fishing grounds. A now deserted village, it was once a busy place, when 2,000 fishermen could stay there during the height of the fishing season, when fishermen rowed and sailed to Grip from all over, to catch cod. 

Grip Island

Centralization led to a declining population after World War II, and Grip became deserted in 1974 when Hildur and Kasper Larsen left just before Christmas. Visitors will find a trip to Grip one of the best excursions along the coast of Fjord Norway in summertime.

Grip Island

Grip Island

Grip Island

The Atlantic Highway

Atlantic Ocean Road isn’t long- just over 5 miles, but this short Norwegian road has a reputation rivalling even some of the most iconic American roads such as Route 66 and the Loneliest Road. Built in the 1980s, the road and its 8 breath-taking (and sometimes terrifying) bridges has become one of the country’s most popular tourist attractions.

The Atlantic Highway

The Atlantic Ocean Road connects a chain of Norwegian islands with the road seeming to hug the sea. During its construction the sea seemed to almost challenge the idea of the road invading its space, sending 12 European windstorms to deter its completion. They however won out over Mother Nature and the road was opened to travellers in 1989.

The Atlantic Highway

Norway recognizes the road as an official “Cultural Heritage Site” and “National Tourist Route,” but its biggest honor came when the road was named the “Norwegian Construction of the Century.”

The Atlantic Highway

Storseisundet Bridge

It is a bridge on one of Norway's most scenic and popular tourist roads - the Atlantic Ocean Road (Atlanterhavsveien in Norwegian). The bridge named Storseisundet makes a sharp bend as it jumps over a number of small islands and waterways. 

Storseisundet Bridge

The approach to the bridge looks scary as the bridge seems to end abruptly and as if any attempt to proceed would result into the vehicle flying out and dropping into the waters below.

Storseisundet Bridge

The Atlantic Road which connects Norway's mainland to the Island of Averøy is spanned by eight bridges of which Storseisundet is the longest and most spectacular. The bridge is constructed in such a way as to create the illusion of a “bridge to nowhere” in approaching him at a certain angle.

Storseisundet Bridge

Geirangerfjord

An iconic attraction featuring many of the characteristic natural and cultural charms of the Norwegian fjords.

Geirangerfjord

The Geirangerfjord reaches more than 100 kilometres inland from Ålesund on the Atlantic coast to the fjord-head at Geiranger. The first stretch contains many lively small towns and villages, such as Sula on the fjord’s north bank, and the settlements that once were centres for Arctic seal hunting.

Geirangerfjord

Trollstigen

This twisting mountain pass full of hairpins is, without exaggeration, world famous. Each year it’s being driven by many road-trip enthusiasts. The translation for the word ‘Trollstigen’ is‘ladder for trolls’ or ‘troll steps’.

Trollstigen

It has grown out to be one of the most famous roads in the world after opened in 1936. With clear weather you can look down on the twisting Trollstigen pass, the Stigfossen waterfall, the surrounding mountains and the entire valley, it’s definitely worth a stop

Trollstigen

Royal palace Oslo

The Palace is a symbol of the Norwegian history. It was made as a residence for King Carl Johan in 1849 but it was not finished util his death. The Royal Palace is owned by the state and there live the royal family which actually has no real political power in the country, only a representative. 

Royal palace Oslo

There is a big park around The Royal Palace called Slottsparken park. One can walk right up to Slottet, it is not fenced The changing of the Guard takes place each day between 13.30 and 1400hrs, both at the Royal Palace, and at Akershus Fortress a must watch.

Inside Royal palace Oslo

Stigfossen Waterfall

While riding towards Trollstigen many hair pin turning you can found and An impressive bridge in natural stone carries it across the Stigfossen waterfall. As the falls proper begins, the stream churns and rolls down a slope, increasing in steepness very quickly until it is falling nearly vertically.

Stigfossen Waterfall

Stigfossen Waterfall

Stigfossen Waterfall