Greece

Greece has attracted 26.5 million visitors in 2015 and is projected to attract 30 million visitors in 2016 contributing nearly one fifth to the nation's Gross Domestic Product, with its capital city Athens, as well as Santorini, Mykonos, Rhodes, Corfu, Crete and Chalkidice being some of the country's major tourist destinations. If you are planning for vacation there some of the things you need to consider. Citing weak financial condition Greece govt. has closed all the banks so that their citizen can’t withdraw money, in that case you can bring some euros in cash with a better security provision. Also take credit card with minimum or no charges on foreign transaction, these thing will help you while visiting this country.

 

Greece is rich in culture and beauty that it never seems to be completely explored, no matter how many times you visit it. After all, this is one of the reasons that brought it in the list with the top 20 tourist destinations worldwide

Navagio beach

Navagio beach is an exposed cove, sometimes referred to as "Smugglers Cove", on the coast of Zakynthos, in the Ionian Islands of Greece. Navagio Beach was originally known as Agios Georgios. Navagio is one of the most beautiful beaches in Greece. It is located on the north-west shore of the stunning Zakynthos Island (also known as Zante), an Ionian island, the third in length.

Navagio beach

Navagio Beach or the Shipwreck, is an isolated sandy cove on Zakynthos island and one of the most famous and most photographed beaches in Greece. Navagio Beach is often referred to as the Shipwreck Beach or just simply “The Shipwreck” because it is home to the wreck of a ship called Panagiotis that is believed to have been a smugglers ship. The presence of alleged smugglers ship gave Navagio Beach yet another nick name ‘Smugglers Cove’.

Navagio beach

The area is defined by its sheer limestone cliffs, white sand beaches, and clear blue water, which attract thousands of tourists yearly. The strip of beach is accessed only by boat, but you can see it from above if you stand on the high side of the cliffs that overlook it.

Paradise Beach

After a day relaxing on the sand or jet-skiing through the water and water it is considered to be very cold due to the cold currents, Paradise Beach is where holiday makers come to party when the sun goes down. Paradise Beach is a 20-minute drive from Chora Mykonos, one of the many bays on the indented south coast.

Paradise Beach

With fine white sand and crystal clear waters Paradise beach is extremely well organized, with sunbeds, umbrellas, water sports and restaurants with fresh fish, Greek and international cuisine. There is no chance of not visiting this beach when coming to the island. Even the locals, the first chance they get they’re off to Paradise Beach. 

Paradise Beach water park

Not far from here there is a small water park right in the sea. Of course it can hardly be called a real water park. It’s rather a complex consisting of a few slides and inflatable rocks in the water. But I suppose the place may be very exciting for teenagers.

Parthenon

The Parthenon is a former temple on the Athenian Acropolis, Greece, dedicated to the goddess Athena, whom the people of Athens considered their patron. Construction began in 447 BC when the Athenian Empire was at the peak of its power.

Parthenon

Built for worship of the goddess Athena, it was to give thanks for the salvation of Athens and Greece in the Persian Wars. Officially it is called the Temple of Athena the Virgin; the name Parthenon comes from the Greek word for virgin.

Parthenon night

The Parthenon was elaborately decorated with marble sculptures both internally and externally. These survive only in part, but there are good descriptions of most of those parts that have been lost. With the coming of the temple, housing its image within it and itself developed as a sculptural embodiment of the god's presence and character, the meaning becomes double, both of the deity in nature and the god as imagined by men. 

 

Corfu Town

With the passage of time the island may have changed, but we can still feel the spirit of a distant glorious past .Its rich multi-cultural heritage, its historic monuments, its stunning natural landscape, its crystal clear seas, and its excellent weather all year round explain why Corfu is one of the most cosmopolitan Mediterranean destinations weaving a powerful spell on its visitors.

Corfu Town

Corfu (Kérkyra), unlike the rest of Greece, never fell under the Ottoman oppression. Due to the successive dominations of the Venetians, the French and the British over the centuries, the island has primarily become part of the Western rather the Levantine world. Their culture wielded strong influence in the city: it was here that the first Greek University (theIonian Academy), the first Philharmonic Orchestra and the First School of Fine Arts were founded.

Corfu town saint-michael-george-palace

Corfu town Saint Michael George palace

All that blend of architectural style gives to Corfu Town a unique charm, character and atmosphere that reminds of the glamorous Italian town of Naples. Having been greatly expanded during the Venetian times, Corfu is separated into a northern and a southern section.

Corfu beautiful blue sea
Corfu-Achilleion entrance

Achilleion Entrance

Temple of Poseidon

The ancient Greeks certainly knew how to choose a temple location, as Cape Sounion is a remarkable site. The Temple of Poseidon is perched on a rocky hilltop overlooking the sea, a gleaming white beacon for ancient (as well as modern) travellers along this dangerous stretch of coast.

Temple of Poseidon

Construction on a grand Temple of Poseidon began around 500 BC but was never completed, the temple and all the prayerful offerings were destroyed by the Persians in 480 BC. The Temple of Poseidon that now stands at Soúnio was built in 445 BC atop the older temple ruins. The Temple of Athena was also built at this era, atop her ancient sanctuary on the cape.

Temple of Poseidon

Local marble was used for the Temple of Poseidon's Doric columns, 15 of the original 34 survive today. The The Doric colums are about 20 feet tall and three feet in diameter,  were cut with only 16 flutings instead of the usual 20, which reduced the surface area exposed to the wind and sea water.

Delphi

Delphi is the second most important archaeological site in Greece (after the Acropolis in Athens). In ancient times Delphi was considered the place where heaven and earth met so the gods were close by. Delphi was a sanctuary to the god Apollo. It was here that the Oracle of Delphi was situated, the most trusted oracle in the ancient world from which the spirit of Apollo gave advice on everything from domestic matters to wars. 

Delphi

This extensive mountainside archaeological complex contains the remains of the sanctuaries of Apollo and Athena Pronaia, also a stadium and a theatre. Delphi Archaeological Museum displays artefacts found among the wrecks.

Delphi

Delphi

Acropolis of Athens

The Acropolis of Athens is an ancient citadel located on a high rocky outcrop above the city of Athens and contains the remains of several ancient buildings of great architectural and historic significance, the most famous being the Parthenon. 

Acropolis of Athens

Notable structures within the Acropolis include the Temple of Athena Nike, the earliest fully Ionic temple on the site, built between 427 and 424 BC. Even now, the Classical architecture of the temples influences the building styles of our modern cities. But the thick pollution of Athens has taken its toll on the gleaming white marble of which the temples are made, as have souvenir-hunters, including the British Government, which still has the famous Elgin Marbles in the British Museum. These days, the area is heavily protected, undergoing restoration, and is a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Acropolis of Athens with Athena Nike

Acropolis of Athens Athena Nike

Meteora

The Metéora is one of the largest and most important complexes of Eastern Orthodox monasteries in Greece, second only to Mount Athos. Meteora, located in central Greece, is a place of natural beauty and man-made wonder. 

Meteora

The huge natural rock towers found here are home to 14th-century clifftop monasteries built by Eastern Orthodox hermit monks who settled in the area in the ninth century and began living in the caves and fissures of the rocks. Originally built to fend off Turkish invaders, the inaccessible monasteries (six of 20 survive) have been identified by UNESCO has an area of world significance.

Meteora

Temple of Olympian Zeus

The Temple of Olympian Zeus, also known as the Olympieion or Columns of the Olympian Zeus, is a colossal ruined temple in the centre of the Greek capital Athens that was dedicated to Zeus, king of the Olympian gods.

Temple of Olympian Zeus

The temple was dedicated to the worship of Zeus, king of the gods of Mount Olympus, and once contained a massive statue of the god. Of this, there is no trace and only fifteen of its original 104 columns still stand. Over the centuries much of its marble has been recycled or stolen for other temples, or perhaps, over the centuries, a bit of garden paving.

Temple of Olympian Zeus

Santorini

Crescent-shaped Santorini (or Thíra), the precious gem of the Aegean, is actually a group of islands consisting of Thíra, Thirassiá, Asproníssi, Palea and Nea Kaméni in the southernmost part of Cyclades.

Santorini

The whole complex of Santorini islands is still an active volcano (the same as Méthana, Mílos and Nísiros) and probably the only volcano in the world whose crater is in the sea. The islands that form Santorini came into existence as a result of intensive volcanic activity, twelve huge eruptions occurred, one every 20,000 years approximately, and each violent eruption caused the collapse of the volcano’s central part creating a large crater (caldera). The volcano, however, managed to recreate itself over and over again.

Santorini

Santorini is considered to be the most sought after place for a romantic getaway in Greece, since there are not many places in the world where you can enjoy exquisitely clear waters while perched on the rim of a massive active volcano in the middle of the sea. The island has a growing reputation as a “wedding destination” for couples not only from Greece but from all over the world. 

Santorini

A trip to Santorini with the other half is a dream for anyone who has seen at least one photo of the island’s famous Caldera and exchanging kisses beneath Santorini’s famous sunset is the ultimate romantic experience.

Ancient Thira

The archaeological site at Akrotiri may be closed, but fortunately you can get your fill of excavations at the site of Ancient Thira. There’s a mix of ruins to explore, including Hellenistic, Roman and Byzantine remnants, excavated in the 1890s. Take a tour to identify the different structures temples, houses, the market (agora), theatre and gymnasium.

Ancient Thira

It is supposed that the town was inhabited during the 8th century BC by Dorian colonists from Sparta and some of the sanctuaries found on the site date back to 2nd and 3rd c. BC. The town was built along the long narrow ridge of the hill, with open air sanctuaries, temples, heroa, public buildings, a theatre, an agora, shops, residences and a well-developed road network with drainage system. The preserved ruins belong to the Hellenistic and Roman phases of the city. The residential area and the larger part of the cemeteries were excavated by German archaeologists between 1895 and 1902. 

Ancient Thira

Oia

The small exquisite village of Oia perches at the northern end of santorini, tumbling down the steep incline from the top of the caldera towards the water. Famous for its whitewashed houses, blue domed churches, and narrowed cobbled walkways lined with small stores, galleries, and restaurants, The sunsets and views over the caldera are major attractions. Romance is in the air. 

Oia

If you came to Santorini for the sunsets, the town of Oia is where you want to be when the sun sinks towards the horizon to such glorious effect.Perched on the steep edge of the caldera, with open views of the sea, the village is quieter than the island’s main town, Fira, at least outside sunset hours.

Oia sunset

A string of tavernas turn their faces to the caldera for those views, and it’s fun exploring the town’s tiny backstreets and rocky cliff face, where homes have been carved from the volcanic rock. There’s some seriously chic boutique accommodations in Oia, complete with infinity pools and spas. The lucky people staying on for the evening dine in Oia’s gourmet restaurants, perched on terraces to catch the best views.

Terrace of the Lions

The huge site sprawls along the island’s west coast, from the stadium in the north to the old trading warehouses to the south. Standouts include the Sanctuary of Apollo temples and the Terrace of the Lions. 

Terrace of the Lions

The remains of private houses surround the semi-circular Theatre, and the site includes several agoras, monuments, sanctuaries and temples. You can see finds from the excavations at the site museum, including the original lions from the much-photographed Terrace of the Lions. Another must-do is the climb up nearby Mt Kythnos for views over the island, sea and site.

Terrace of the Lions

Terrace of the Lions

Little Venice

Little Venice is a romantic spot where we stopped to watch the sunset. This neighbourhood is replete with elegant and gorgeous old white houses with blue trim that are situated precariously on the edge of the sea. Quite amazing are the sunset views from Little Venice. Its whitewashed edifices against the backdrop of the azure blue Aegean Sea is simply marvellous. 

Little Venice Greece

Little Venice evolved from the picturesque Alevkantra beach and extends right into the peripheral areas of Kastro, Little Venice is one of the most photographed tourist neighbourhood in Europe. 

Little Venice Greece

Little Venice

Acropolis of Lindos

Nestling at the foot of a steep rock and beautifully surrounded by the sea lies the traditional settlement of Líndos, on the top of the same rock stands a centuries-old acropolis. The acropolis bears silent witness to Líndos’ glorious past, a major naval power of ancient times which reputedly had a population of 17,000. 

Acropolis of Lindos

The landscape of Líndos encapsulates the essence of Rhodes, a surprisingly felicitous blend of ancient and medieval. With 600,000 tourists annually visit Líndos competes with Delphi as the second most visited archaeological site in Greece. 

Acropolis of Lindos

Acropolis of Lindos

Blue Caves

The bright blue and turquoise waters of the Greek Islands have inspired many a postcard, but it is difficult to imagine a more beautiful spot than the Blue Caves of Zakynthos. Zakynthos, sometimes known by Zante is the third largest of the Ionian Islands. Its unique landscape of steep coastal cliffs, green valleys, and many gulfs and beaches make this one of Greece’s most highly regarded natural sites.

Blue Caves

A small entrance will lead the way to a beautiful sea cave of which the walls are a sparkling blue and the water is crystal clear. The blue walls are a reflection from the water and you can see the stag mites and just how big the cave really is. This is an amazing place for tourists and see the beautiful mother nature inside blue cave.

Blue Caves

Blue Caves

Temple of Hephaestus

The Temple of Hephaestus and Athena was begun in 449 BC, just two years before the Parthenon. The project was sponsored by the Athenian politician Pericles and designed by an unknown architect whose handiwork can be seen throughout Attica. This temple was the first in Athens to be made of marble.

Temple of Hephaestus

The temple has sometimes been called the Theseum due to a belief that it was a hero shrine dedicated to Theseus. This was based on the depictions of Theseus that occupy the metopes. In the 7th century, the temple was converted to the Church of St. George Akamas. The east end was given a semi-circular apse and walled in to form a modest square building. In the early 19th century, this temple-turned-church became a burial place for many Protestants and those who died in the Greek War of Independence in 1821.

Temple of Hephaestus

The church remained in use through 1834, then became a museum until the 1930s. It has since been restored to its original Greek appearance.